by May 1, 1999 0 comments

The first PC OS

CP/M, short for control program for
microprocessors, is widely recognized as the first operating system for personal
computers. It was first developed for 8-bit computers by Digital. Since then, there have
been three major releases of CP/M. The final release–3.1–evolved into DR DOS
(DR: Digital Research) This was brought by Novell and came to be known as Novell DOS.

When Ray Noorda left Novell to form Caldera, he took Novell
DOS with him, and called it Caldera DRDOS. Caldera DOS, which is still alive, is a
multitasking operating system aimed at the embedded applications market.

When IBM was developing the PC, they approached Digital to
develop an OS for it. Digital was not interested. IBM went to Microsoft, and the rest, as
they say, is history.

It takes teams of thousands and several years to make
a complete OS. But sometimes, one man stands out from the team, and the OS gets identified
with that one person…

AlanCox.JPG (7405 bytes)Alan Cox A self-styled kernel hacker who’s acknowledged as
Linus’ right-hand man in developing the Linux kernel. Focuses on the SMP and
networking aspects of Linux.

Andrew S Tanenbaum Professor
at Vrije University, Amsterdam, Tanenbaum is one of the authorities on operating systems.
Also wrote Minix, a Unix clone.
Professor
at Vrije University, Amsterdam, Tanenbaum is one of the authorities on operating systems.
Also wrote Minix, a Unix clone.

billjoy.JPG (6914 bytes)Bill
Joy
The Joy of Unix. One of the leading lights of BSD Unix in the early days.
Subsequently, co-founded Sun. Wrote the C-shell, and designed Sun’s network file
system. Currently, chief scientist at Sun.

Brad Silverberg The
leader of the Windows team at Microsoft. Currently, on extended sabbatical.
The
leader of the Windows team at Microsoft. Currently, on extended sabbatical.

David Cutler Developer
of Digital Unix. Later joined Microsoft (1988) as one of the kingpins of the NT
development team.
Developer
of Digital Unix. Later joined Microsoft (1988) as one of the kingpins of the NT
development team.

Donna Dubinsky and Jeff Hawkins Kick started the handheld market with the Palm
Pilot and the PalmOS. Their company, Palm Computing was bought out by US Robotics, which
was taken over by 3Com. Later, they left 3Com to form Handspring, which develops products
for the handheld market. Interestingly, Palm Computing has always had women at the helm of
affairs.
and Jeff Hawkins Kick started the handheld market with the Palm
Pilot and the PalmOS. Their company, Palm Computing was bought out by US Robotics, which
was taken over by 3Com. Later, they left 3Com to form Handspring, which develops products
for the handheld market. Interestingly, Palm Computing has always had women at the helm of
affairs.

MVS any body?

MVS (multiple virtual storage) is the OS of the older IBM
mainframes. Introduced in 1974, it has since been replaced by OS/390.

Incidentally, IBM has had a singularly unimaginative way of
naming their operating systems: OS/2, OS 6000, OS 390, and so on.

James Gosling

Developed Java. Though Java is not an OS, it offers OS independence to developers. He is
currently the vice
jeanlouisgassee.JPG (6073 bytes)president at Sun.

Jean Louis Gassé The
moving force behind the BeOS.
The
moving force behind the BeOS.

Ken Thompson and Denis Ritchie Ensured their place amongst the all-time greats
of the computing world by developing Unix.

Linus Benedict Torvalds Perhaps
the most talked about OS linus.JPG (5455 bytes)developer today. Started
developing Linux while a student at the Helsinki University, Finland. Today, he is one of
the leading lights of the free software movement. Linus works at Transmeta, a company
promoted by Paul Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft. However, not much is known about what
Transmeta is up to.

stevejobs.JPG (6982 bytes)Steven
Jobs
Developed the Macintosh and the
MacOS. Left Apple to form Next, and
developed NextStep. Returned to Apple to lead the company back to a remarkable recovery.
MacOS X is being developed during his second tenure at Apple.

bilgates.JPG (8159 bytes)William H Gates Jr

Better known as Bill Gates. The richest man in the world. Wrote the BASIC interpreter and
MS DOS. Is widely accepted to be the visionary behind Windows and other MS products.

 

Ramlal Bhagat and his 32-bit “O-Yes”

Apparently, Ramlal Bhagat is a 12th standard student in Haryana who has developed a superior, graphical,
32-bit operating system for the PC that’s faster than any available. Apparently, he
named it “O-Yes”. And apparently, HCL brought this operating system off Ramlal.

The only problem is that Ramlal has been in the 12th standard for as long
as one can remember, and HCL has not been able to do anything further beyond purchasing
it, all these years.

Oh-Yes! The scam still surfaces every once in a while in mailing lists,
and a few gullible souls get taken in every time it does.

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